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Michael and David Radparvar

Brothers Mike and Dave Radparvar are pursuing lives filled with passion and purpose – and inspiring others to do the same – through Holstee, their unique brand of enthusiasm and apparel.


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Michael and David Radparvar
“From our products to our website, I am always looking to offer the most story-worthy experiences while minimizing the impact of our lifestyle with every step.”

​From the outset, Mike and Dave envisioned Holstee more as an embodiment of their values than just a purely profit-driven enterprise. They opted for a manifesto in lieu of a business plan when they fired up operations, and allowed design to stoke the initiative. “I see myself first as a designer,” Dave says when asked about what inspires the work he and his brother do. “From our products to our website, I am always looking to offer the most story-worthy experiences while minimizing the impact of our lifestyle with every step.”

Their Holstee Manifesto states in part, “Do what you love and do it often” — a message that has resonated with the global community. It has been “shared over 500,000 times and viewed over 60 million times online,” translated into several languages by their fans and customers, and is the subject of their short brand film. The duo have set out to do what they love, building a business around the idea of valuing equally product (good design), planet (ecological soundness), and people (respect for the people behind production).

The idea for the first product came out of a simple desire for a soft T-shirt with a functional pocket — the result was their Recycled Tees line, made of 100% recycled plastic bottles. The tees were not only thoughtfully designed, but also benefited the planet by removing plastic from the waste stream.

People, Holstee’s third and most ambitious principle, are addressed through more than just fair sourcing and pricing; a partnership with the micro-lender Kiva channels ten percent of their profits to start-ups in developing nations. To more thoroughly address these economies — and the people who drive them — Mike and Dave’s second product was a wallet made from plastic bags collected off the streets of Delhi. This process employed the bag-collectors with a living wage three times higher than their normal income, as well as access to medical care.

The brothers have expanded their retail offerings with a carefully curated selection of other producers goods, from water bottles to knit hats, that align with their vision and manifesto.